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Hair Loss Treatment

Noticeable hair loss can be distressing in both sexes. In women, it can be even more so due to unrealistic societal expectations.

About one-third of women experience hair loss (alopecia) at some time in their lives; among postmenopausal women, as many as two-thirds suffer hair thinning or bald spots. Hair loss in women often has a greater impact than hair loss does on men w, because it's less socially acceptable for them. Alopecia can severely affect a woman's emotional well-being and quality of life.

The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men - androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss.

In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness.

Female balding Male balding

In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.

Ludwig Classification

There are many potential causes of hair loss in women, including medical conditions, life changes such as pregnancy and menopause, medications, and physical or emotional stress. If you notice unusual hair loss of any kind, it's important to see your doctor to determine the cause and appropriate treatment. You may also want to consider a referral to a therapist to address stresses in your life that may be contributing.

Almost every woman eventually develops some degree of female pattern hair loss. It can start any time after the onset of puberty, but women tend to first notice it around menopause, when hair loss typically increases. The risk rises with age, and it's higher for women with a history of hair loss on either side of the family.

In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia (related to the male hormones known as androgens) occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."

A doctor diagnoses female pattern hair loss by taking a medical history and examining the scalp. She or he will observe the pattern of hair loss, check for signs of inflammation or infection, and possibly order blood tests to investigate other possible causes of hair loss, including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism and iron deficiency.

Hair Loss Treatment - how to stop hair thinning 

As with most concerns involving hair and skin, improvement takes time. It takes on average 4-6 months with hair loss treatments to begin to see improvement. Additionally, any medication prescribed will need to be used longterm. Ceasing the medication will mean a gradual return to your previous status, and in-clinic treatments are recommended annually to help support the at home care.

 

 

 

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